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Valentine's Day History

February 12th, 2020

Valentine’s Day is best known as a celebration of love in all its forms. Pink hearts, red roses, and cute greeting cards adorn every surface you see. What many people don’t realize is that the modern Valentine’s Day celebration arose from a religious holiday.

St. Valentine’s Day was originally celebrated as a religious feast day in honor of early Christian martyrs. Three martyrs named Valentine were honored: a priest in Rome, the persecuted bishop of Interamna (a town in central Italy), and a saint martyred in Africa. This saint’s day was celebrated throughout Christendom, although it was removed from the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints in 1969.

The origin of Valentine’s Day as a holiday for lovers began with Geoffrey Chaucer in his 1382 poem “Parlement of Foules.” Chaucer wrote, “For this was on Saint Valentine’s Day, when every bird cometh there to choose his mate,” and the modern romantic holiday was born. William Shakespeare and other writers mentioned Valentine’s Day as a day of love.

Valentine’s Day as we know it came about in the early 19th century. In Victorian England, printers began manufacturing small numbers of cards with romantic verses, lace, ribbons, and other frills. Anonymous Valentine’s Day card were a popular way for young lovers to exchange romantic sentiments in an otherwise prudish time. As the 19th century progressed, printers began mass manufacturing Valentine’s Day cards. People in the United States give an estimated 190 million valentines every year, and up to one billion if you count children exchanging cards at school! With the rise of the Internet, Valentine’s Day e-cards have become a popular mode of communication, with millions of e-cards sent each year.

The other items associated with Valentine’s Day include chocolate and flowers. The tradition of giving chocolates has been around for decades, and Richard Cadbury created the first box of Valentine’s Day chocolates nearly 150 years ago. Today, purchases of chocolate total over $1 billion in the United States alone, with 35 million heart-shaped boxes sold each year. Loved ones also exchange flowers, with red roses being associated with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. On Valentine’s Day itself, florists sell nearly 200 million stems of roses.

Although many people dismiss Valentine’s Day as a commercialized “Hallmark holiday,” it is beloved to couples and romantics across the United States and other countries. The team at San Antonio Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates, P.A. wants to remind all patients that no matter what your celebratory plans, February 14th can be a wonderful day to celebrate the loved ones in your life. Happy Valentine’s Day!

February is Heart Month

February 5th, 2020

The American Academy of Periodontology stresses the importance of good oral health since gum disease may be linked to heart disease and stroke. Thus far, no cause-and-effect relationship has been established, but there are multiple theories to explain the link between heart disease and periodontal disease. One theory suggests that oral bacteria may affect heart health when it enters the blood and attaches to the fatty plaque in the heart's blood vessels. This can cause the formation of blood clots. Another theory suggests the possibility that inflammation could be a contributing link between periodontal disease and heart disease. Gum disease increases plaque buildup, and inflamed gums may also contribute to the development of swollen or inflamed coronary arteries.

What is coronary artery disease?

Coronary artery disease is caused in part by the buildup of fatty proteins on the walls of the coronary arteries. Blood clots cut off blood flow, preventing oxygen and nutrients from getting to the heart. Both blood clots and the buildup of fatty proteins (also called plaque) on the walls of the coronary arteries may lead to a heart attack. Moreover, periodontal disease nearly doubles the likelihood that someone will suffer from coronary artery disease. Periodontal disease can also worsen existing heart conditions, so many patients who suffer from heart disease need to take antibiotics before any dental procedures. This is especially true of patients who are at greatest risk for contracting infective endocarditis (inflammation of the inner layer of the heart). The fact that more than 2,400 people die from heart disease each day makes it a major public health issue. It is also the leading killer of both men and women in the United States today.

What is periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the bone and gum tissues around the teeth, reducing or potentially eradicating the system that supports your teeth. It affects roughly 75 percent of Americans, and is the leading cause of adult tooth loss. People who suffer from periodontal disease may notice that their gums swell and/or bleed when they brush their teeth.

Although there is no definitive proof to support the theory that oral bacteria affects the heart, it is widely acknowledged better oral health contributes to overall better health. When people take good care of their teeth, get thorough exams, and a professional cleaning twice a year, the buildup of plaque on the teeth is lessened. A healthy, well-balanced diet will also contribute to better oral and heart health. There is a lot of truth to the saying "you are what you eat." If you have any questions about you periodontal disease and your overall health, give our San Antonio or Castroville office a call!

Is oral surgery right for you?

January 29th, 2020

You have a pain along the back of your jaw. You think it may be an impacted wisdom tooth struggling to make its appearance. But you aren't sure you need a dentist to see it. The pain is only minor, and popping a few aspirin makes it feel fine after a day or two.

Patients in similar situations like yours come in to see Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman every day with the same problem. They don't realize that this simple, recurring pain from an impacted wisdom tooth can lead to more serious problems. It will also lead to a procedure called oral surgery.

What Is oral surgery?

Oral surgery, also called oral and maxillofacial surgery, is a dental surgical procedure that treats diseases and injuries along the teeth, jaw, and facial bone area of the face. Treatments can consist of surgery that will remove the problem tooth, install implants and other orthodontic appliances, remove abnormal tissue growths, and treat infected gums.

What types of oral surgery treatment are available?

Oral surgery can treat a number of patient problems that you have probably heard of, and others that you may not have considered. Oral surgeons will address issues such as impacted teeth by removing the tooth, fix tooth loss by surgically adding dental implants, and treat certain jaw disorders that create facial pain (TMJ disorders).

In addition to these normal dental procedures, oral surgeons will also remove growth of tissues for a biopsy to be performed. This helps identify cysts and tumors that form in the mouth. Oral surgeons can treat facial infections that can lead to life-threatening situations for patients. They can even help you, and your spouse, sleep better at night by performing surgery to alleviate snoring or sleep apnea problems.

When should you go to an oral surgeon?

Never wait until the pain increases to the point where you can't sleep at night or the pain affects your concentration at work. The sooner you see Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman who can diagnose and identify the problem, the faster you can be on the road to having good dental hygiene. If you experience any type of facial trauma, something happens with your existing dental appliances where it's becoming difficult to eat, or you notice swollen and bleeding gums, seek dental help immediately.

You don't have to suffer through the pain. With our expert and caring help, we will get you smiling again.

Does smoking affect oral health?

January 22nd, 2020

By now, everyone knows that smoking is bad for you. But the truth is its broad-reaching health effects are not all known by everyone. This is especially true of oral health. Smoking can have serious repercussions in this regard. To give you a better idea of how smoking can affect your oral health, Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman and our team have listed some issues that can arise.

Oral Cancer

Oral cancer can have steep ramifications for anyone that gets it. Surgery can be required to eliminate the cancer before it spreads to more vital parts of your body. Any type of cancer is about the worst health effect you can get, and this especially holds true to the affects that smoking has on your mouth. The type of mouth surgery required with oral cancer can leave your face deconstructed in certain areas, and it is all due to smoking or use of other tobacco products.

Tooth Discoloration and Bad Breath

At the very least, it is fair to say that as a smoker you will often have bad breath, and while you may try to cover it up with gum or mints, tooth discoloration is a whole other story. The chemicals and substances in cigarettes stick to your teeth staining them brown and yellow colors that are increasingly difficult to disguise.

Gum Disease and Loss of Bone

Another effect of smoking is the increased risk of gum disease. Your gums may start to recede, which can eventually lead to the loss of teeth. Smoking can also increase bone loss and density in your jaw which is vital to the health of your mouth. Gum disease and bone loss are two signs that smoking is definitely bad for your mouth.

When it comes to the health of your mouth, the question is not whether smoking affects your health, it's how does it affect your health and to what degree. If for no other reason than because smoking involves your mouth as its entry point, it is safe to say that it can have long-lasting and detrimental consequences on your oral health.

To learn more about smoking and your oral health, contact our San Antonio or Castroville office to schedule an appointment with Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman.

Should You Have Oral Surgery?

January 15th, 2020

Oral surgery, also known as maxillofacial surgery, addresses issues in the head, neck, jaw, face, and oral tissues. You may be referred to Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman if it’s the best course of treatment for your problem. As oral surgeons, we are specialized in anesthesia and pain control, which makes us your go-to for this type of care.

There are a few common signs to watch for because they might require oral surgery. Pain in the back of your jaw may be a signal of a wisdom tooth that needs to be removed. If you ignore the pain for an extended period of time and the impacted wisdom tooth begins to rot, that’s when surgery becomes necessary.

If you’ve been experiencing recurring pain in a single problem tooth, it could also be a sign that you’ll need to have oral surgery at some point; otherwise, there’s a potential for tooth loss. Jaw-joint issues that affect your temporomandibular joint (TMJ) may cause pain and stiffness in your jaw or recurring headaches.

Oral surgery treatments include removal of teeth or abnormal mouth tissues, implant or appliance installment, care for infected gums, cleft lip/palate repair, or treatment of sleeping and jaw disorders. We may take a biopsy of your gum tissues if there’s a possibility that cysts or tumors are forming in your mouth. We’re even able to treat life-threatening facial infections and help manage sleep apnea.

Instead of waiting for symptoms to get worse, please contact our San Antonio or Castroville office if you’re experiencing any oral health issues that could lead to oral surgery.

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