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Broken Tooth: Is It an emergency or not?

November 18th, 2020

Have you ever had that sinking feeling after biting into something soft and chewy and feeling something hard and crunchy instead? You’ve chipped or broken a tooth, but what should you do next? First try to assess the damage by determining whether it’s a chip or a whole tooth.

As Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman will tell you, a broken or chipped tooth is usually not a dental emergency unless you are experiencing a great deal of pain or bleeding, but you should contact us for an appointment shortly afterward. Be sure to mention that you have a broken tooth so we can fit you into our schedule quickly. After a thorough evaluation, we’ll recommend a course of action. If it is a small chip, we may simply smooth it out. For a larger break, the dentist may fill in the space with a composite material that matches your other teeth.

Emergency Dental Care

If you are in severe pain, are bleeding excessively, have a major break, or have lost a tooth, that is a dental emergency and you should contact us. As emergency dental specialists, we’ll be able to schedule an appointment immediately and advise you on the next steps to take.

You can rinse your mouth with warm water and apply pressure to stop the bleeding. An ice pack will help reduce any swelling. Do not take any aspirin as that could increase the amount of bleeding. Should your tooth be knocked out completely, rinse it under running water but do not scrub it. Hold the tooth only by the crown, or the part you normally see above the gum line, not by the root. If you can, put the tooth back into the socket while you travel to our office, or put it in a mild salt solution or milk. Don’t let the tooth become dry, because this can lead to damage. Once you get to our office, our dentist will determine whether the tooth can be saved or if it will need to be replaced.

A broken tooth may not always be an emergency, but it’s best to have it treated with us at San Antonio Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates, P.A.. While it may only be a cosmetic problem at first, if left too long without treatment, you may experience further damage to your tooth and mouth.

The Link Between HPV and Oral Cancer

November 11th, 2020

Cancer has become a common word, and it seems like there is new research about it every day. We know antioxidants are important. We know some cancers are more treatable than others. We know some lifestyles and habits contribute to our cancer risk.

Smoking increases our risk of cancer, as does walking through a radioactive power plant. But there is a direct link to oral cancer that you many may not know about—the link between HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) and oral cancer.

This may come as a shock because it has been almost a taboo subject for some time. A person with HPV is at an extremely high risk of developing oral cancer. In fact, smoking is now second to HPV in causing oral cancer!

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, “The human papilloma virus, particularly version 16, has now been shown to be sexually transmitted between partners, and is conclusively implicated in the increasing incidence of young non-smoking oral cancer patients. This is the same virus that is the causative agent, along with other versions of the virus, in more than 90% of all cervical cancers. It is the foundation's belief, based on recent revelations in peer reviewed published data in the last few years, that in people under the age of 50, HPV16 may even be replacing tobacco as the primary causative agent in the initiation of the disease process.” [http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/]

There is a test and a vaccine for HPV; please discuss it with your physician.

There are some devices that help detect oral cancer in its earliest forms. We all know that the survival rate for someone with cancer depends greatly on what stage the cancer is diagnosed. Talk to Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman if you have any concerns.

Please be aware and remember that when it comes to your own health, knowledge is power. When you have the knowledge to make an informed decision, you can make positive changes in your life. The mouth is an entry point for your body. Care for your mouth and it will care for you!

The Difference between Dentists and Oral Surgeons

November 4th, 2020

It’s useful to know what your dentist does in comparison to an oral surgeon. You may end up needing to see the latter at some point in your life, so Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman and our team want you to understand the difference if you need to schedule an appointment with one of us.

Both dentists and oral surgeons are taught the skills to maintain a healthy mouth for their patients. They are both required to obtain a medical license after years of schooling, and some choose to go through additional to schooling to be able to treat specific areas of oral health.

Your general dentist is equipped to perform preventive care and treatment of teeth that show decay and damage. Cosmetic procedures such as teeth whitening and veneer placement are also common. However, in some circumstances, you may need an oral surgeon if the procedure you need to undergo exceeds your dentist’s abilities.

If you’ve been referred to Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman, it may be because you need the following procedure done:

  • Dental implant surgery
  • Removal of a problem tooth
  • Oral cancer biopsies
  • Removal of tumors or cysts
  • Reconstructive surgery of the jaw or face to resolve various problems
  • Corrective surgery of the jaw to improve structure and alignment
  • Grafting of the bone or soft tissues in order to resolve defects and injuries
  • Repair of birth defects that have affected the face or jaw

Staying vigilant about your daily oral health routine and bi-yearly dental appointments may prevent problems that require these services. However, it may be impossible to avoid some of these procedures.

If you have noticed a serious issue involving your oral health, contact our San Antonio or Castroville office and schedule a consultation. Our team will create a plan to treat you quickly and effectively.

Dry Mouth and How to Treat It

October 28th, 2020

In fancy medical terms, dry mouth is known as xerostomia. It’s really just what it sounds like: a condition in which you don’t have enough saliva to keep your mouth moist. Dry mouth can be the result of certain medications you’re taking, aging, tobacco use, nerve damage, or chemotherapy.

Depending on whether you’re aware of the cause of your dry mouth, here are some simple ways to keep it at bay:

  • Avoid drinks that contain alcohol or caffeine
  • Avoid tobacco use, or lower your consumption of tobacco
  • Floss after every meal
  • Brush your teeth after every meal using a fluoride toothpaste
  • Avoid foods that have a high level of salt
  • Stay hydrated and drink water frequently
  • Consider using a humidifier at night

If you have any questions about dry mouth and how it is affecting you, give our San Antonio or Castroville office a call or make sure to ask Dr. Mazock, Dr. Salazar, and Dr. Coleman during your next visit!

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